Government Shutdown

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president.

While hundreds of thousands of federal workers were furloughed during the partial government shutdown, one federal agency was in the midst of a massive recruiting effort.

The Census Bureau has been busy trying to hire around a half million temporary workers to help carry out the upcoming national head count of every person living in the U.S. The census is set to officially kick off next January.

Mesa Verde to Reopen After Repairs, Snow Removal

Jan 28, 2019
C. Scheid

Mesa Verde National Park is set to open to the public next week, over a month after it closed during the partial government shutdown. 

More Americans are being impacted by what is now the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. This week, the already stressful world of air travel is feeling the pinch as Transportation Security Administration workers call in sick.

But for now, things are still operating smoothly at Denver International Airport.

DIA spokeswoman Emily Williams said the average wait time at security checkpoints averaged about 10 minutes on Sunday.

In an unprecedented move, the National Park Service has decided to dip into entrance fee funds to pay for expanded operations during a government shutdown that has furloughed many of its workers.

The decision comes after reports of degradation in the parks — trash thrown on the ground, human waste piling up, and visitors behaving irresponsibly by letting their dogs off leash or even driving off-road to do donuts in the desert.