archaeology

Courtesy of KZMU

The Bureau of Land Management is investigating vandalism at Birthing Rock, a petroglyph panel in the Moab area estimated to be at least 1,000 years old. The vandalism included the phrase ‘white power’ scrawled over anthropomorphic figures. The BLM Utah office  says vandalism and graffiti erase the important stories of Indigenous people who came before us and are still important to the spiritual and cultural lives of living Indigenous communities.

KZMU’s Molly Marcello spoke to former BLM Moab archeologist Don Montoya about what he calls a ‘crisis’ in destructive behavior. Montoya currently works as a consultant for the repatriation of Native American human remains and sacred objects. 


Mesa Verde Voices

Mar 25, 2021

Mesa Verde Voices is a podcast that that connects the past with the present through stories about people, places, and agriculture in the American Southwest. During KSJD's spring fund drive, Tom Yoder talked with Mesa Verde Voices host and producer Kayla Woodward about how the podcast episodes come together, the variety of voices that are included, and what to expect in the fourth season of the podcast.

Author Craig Childs Returns To "House of Rain"

Feb 19, 2021
houseofrain.com

Craig Childs is a river guide, adventurer, and the author of more than a dozen books on nature and science, including The Secret Knowledge of Water, Atlas of a Lost World, and House of Rain. Crow Canyon Archaeological Center will host Childs for "Return to House of Rain with Craig Childs" a two-part virtual event on February 25th and March 4th where he will discuss the ancient landscapes of the Four Corners region and ways of seeing and understanding settlement, migration, warfare, and community long before the colonial era. KSJD's Tom Yoder talked with Childs about the Crow Canyon events, the importance of being in nature during a pandemic, and the projects and adventures he has planned for the future.

Just outside Durango, Colo., archeologist Rand Greubel stands on a mesa surrounded by juniper trees. He points to a circular hole in the ground, about 30 feet across and more than 8 feet deep. There's a fire pit in the center of an earthen floor, ventilation shafts tunneled into the side walls and bits of burned thatching that suggest how the structure once continued to rise above the ground. It's a large pit house from what's known as the Pueblo I period.

"We knew right away that it was highly significant just because of the sheer size of it," Greubel says.

Liz Perry and Sarah Payne of Crow Canyon Archaeological Center join KSJD's Tom Yoder during the Fall Harvest Drive to talk about Crow Canyon's origins, their educational programs, and how they contribute to archaeological research in the Four Corners area and beyond.

Pages