mental health

As Americans flock to gun stores in the face of coronavirus fears, many gun dealers report an influx of new customers, taking home a deadly weapon for the first time. In response, long-time gun owners from across the U.S. are stepping up to help these newcomers get some safety training in the age of social distancing.

Emma Simpson on Unsplash

As Four Corners residents remain under some form of a stay-at-home order for the next several weeks, you may find yourself feeling stressed about the coronavirus outbreak and what the future holds.

Feeling uncertain is just one of the normal responses to a high-stress situation, according to Shelley Millsap, a behavioral health manager at Axis Health System. 

It's a lesson you learn as early as grade school: If you find yourself injured, threatened or otherwise in harm's way, just break out your phone and dial a simple, three-digit number: 911. After more than five decades, the 911 emergency call system has become so memorable and ubiquitously known, it even has its own network TV adaptation.

But what if the danger is rooted less in the physical, and more in one's mental health?

It has been five years, but the memory still haunts construction superintendent Michelle Brown.

A co-worker ended his workday by giving away his personal cache of hand tools to his colleagues. It was a generous but odd gesture; no one intending to return to work would do such a thing.

The man went home and killed himself. He was found shortly afterward by co-workers who belatedly realized the significance of his gifts.

"It's a huge sign, but we didn't know that then," Brown says. "We know it now."

State lawmakers are advancing a bipartisan response to the deadly shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch that occurred in May.

On Thursday, lawmakers on a new school safety committee approved five bills they think will make schools safer in the wake of that shooting.

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