Native American

Native Lens

At a time when stay-at-home orders lead to feelings of isolation from your community, a new DIY storytelling project based in the Four Corners hopes to connect and boost stories through public media.

Native Lens, a project launched this summer in collaboration with Rocky Mountain PBS and KSUT Tribal Radio, is taking a do-it-yourself approach in sharing stories from Native Americans and Indigenous people from around the world. 

It's a bright August morning in the northeast corner of Montana. Robbie Magnan, Game and Fish director for the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, rose before dawn to round up these 40 buffalo into a corral.

If you're experiencing quarantine fatigue, these bulls can relate. They've endured three years of isolation and disease testing.

"Most of their life they've been in some type of quarantine," Magnan says.

On a cool February morning, around 60 people gathered in the Sierra Nevada foothills to take part in a ceremony that, for many decades, was banned.

Wedged between a sprawl of Saguaros and a busy highway in Mexico, Quitobaquito is a tiny oasis.

Wildlife and Indigenous communities have long relied on this rare spring system for freshwater in the middle of the Sonoran Desert.

The spring flows into a pond just a few paces from the U.S.-Mexico border at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. Hia C-ed O'odham and the Tohono O'odham tribal members lived and passed through here long before the park or the border existed.

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that about half of the land in Oklahoma is within a Native American reservation, a decision that will have major consequences for both past and future criminal and civil cases.

The court's decision hinged on the question of whether the Creek reservation continued to exist after Oklahoma became a state.

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