Esther Honig

As a reporter for Harvest Public Media, I travel throughout northern Colorado, and parts of Wyoming and Nebraska to cover agriculture and rural issues. 

I’m originally from Colorado and moved back after a nine year hiatus to work for KUNC. Previously, I spent two years reporting on the opioid epidemic in rural Ohio for the NPR affiliate in Columbus. 

I got my start in radio journalism while attending college in Bay Area, where I earned a degree in Spanish, Latin American Studies. 

Esther Honig/KUNC

Farmers had been growing lettuce in the San Luis Valley for decades, but it wasn’t until the 1950s that the crop started to take off, thanks to advances in farming and vacuumed sealed shipping containers. At the time, locals referred to lettuce as “green gold,” and thousands of heads were shipped to East Coast cities each day.

Late summers in southeastern Colorado are usually synonymous with golden honeydews and cantaloupes, as the Rocky Ford melon harvest gets underway. But as evening temperatures cool, another lesser known ritual begins — the annual tarantula migration.

KUNC’s Esther Honig traveled south hoping to catch a glimpse of the spiders on their journey. 

A computer science major in college, 25-year-old Garrett Hause would fit in at a Silicon Valley startup. But he said he prefers to stay busy and work with his hands, so he decided to do something different.

Last year he took over his grandparents’ farm in Lafayette, Colorado and replaced the fields of alfalfa with five acres of hemp.