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KSJD Local News
Weekdays at 5:32pm during All Things Considered and within Morning Edition newscasts

Four Corners news from the KSJD newsroom, updated weekday afternoons.

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  • Utah’s public education system is expected to get another budget increase this year.
  • Colorado lawmakers have introduced more than one hundred and sixty bills in the first week of their new session. And Colorado Representative Lauren Boebert has been elected by members of the House Freedom Caucus to serve as their Communications Chair.
  • Communities across the US are experiencing surges of the Omicron variant of COVID-19. But the Omicron wave is only starting to pick up momentum here in Southwest Colorado, where about 60% of the population is vaccinated, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. To get details on the situation, KSJD's Lucas Brady Woods spoke to Mark Meyer, head of infection control at Southwest Health System, who says severe COVID infections are concentrated among the unvaccinated.
  • The Ute Mountain Ute tribe of Southwest Colorado is turning to solar generation to provide cheap electricity for its members and infrastructure. But it also has solar ambitions that go beyond the community level. As Rocky Mountain Community Radio’s Lucas Brady Woods reports, they include generating solar power that can be sold for a profit.
  • Montezuma County Commissioner Joel Stevenson has died, after a weeks’ long battle with COVID-19. And it’s taken less than a week for Colorado lawmakers to start engaging in some of the first shouting matches of their new legislative session.
  • Colorado Secretary of state Jena Griswold is suing to stop Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters from overseeing this year’s election. And the state of Colorado saw more deaths on the road last year than it’s seen in almost two decades.
  • It’s the beginning of election season once again, at least in Cortez. The city’s 2022 election is this spring, on April 5. Candidates for city council are just lining up to run. As the process kicks off, KSJD’s Lucas Brady Woods sat down with Cortez City Clerk Linda Smith at City Hall to get an idea of what this year’s municipal election looks like.
  • At the same time a group of Colorado River users gathered in Las Vegas last month to discuss the future of water in the Southwest, another group was having a similar discussion. And Coloradans can now compare health-care costs for services at more than 100 hospitals and facilities across the state.
  • The Bureau of Land Management will reassess its policies on oil- and gas-rich lands near the Navajo Nation, surrounding Chaco Canyon National Historical Park. And the new year has brought plenty of snow to the Mountain West, pushing snowpack totals above average across most of the region.
  • Colorado Gov. Jared Polis delivered his fourth state of the state address to lawmakers on Thursday at the state Capitol. And members of the Navajo Nation Council, along with the tribe’s President Jonathan Nez, attended the 27th annual Indian Nations and Tribes Legislative Day on Wednesday.