All Things Considered

At 5 p.m. EDT on May 3, 1971, the first edition of All Things Considered went on the air. In the more than three decades since, almost everything about the program has changed -- the hosts and producers, the length of the program, the equipment used, even the audience. But one thing remains the same: the determination to get the day's big stories on the air, and to bring them alive through sound and voice. For one hour every weekday on KSJD, All Things Considered hosts Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features. For more information, or listen to an episode you missed, please visit the All Things Considered information page.

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Researchers appear to have shown how the brain creates two different kinds of thirst.

The process involves two types of brain cells, one that responds to a decline in fluid in our bodies, while the other monitors levels of salt and other minerals, a team reports in the journal Nature.

Together, these specialized thirst cells seem to determine whether animals and people crave pure water or something like a sports drink, which contains salt and other minerals.

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An investigation by Oregon Public Broadcasting and ProPublica shows widely differing accounts of the killing of Antifa supporter Michael Forest Reinoehl. At the beginning of September, a federal fugitive task force led by the U.S. Marshals shot and killed Reinoehl near Olympia, Wash. Reinoehl was suspected in the killing of a far-right activist in Portland, Ore., just days earlier. Joining us now is OPB's Conrad Wilson.

Welcome.

CONRAD WILSON, BYLINE: Hi, Ailsa.

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